Encouraging home gardening and seed saving since 1986

Wheat Cross


Wheats are close enough relatives of a number of other members of the grass family that they will occasionally cross, sometimes spontaneously and sometimes through human effort. Some of these crosses, have proved to be useful. The oldest of these crosses is Triticale, which probably originated through a spontaneous cross between wheat and rye. The kernels are rather wrinkled and not as plump as those of wheat. The other two things listed here were deliberate crosses by plant breeders who wanted to increase the genetic diversity in the hope of increasing disease resistance.

Welsh Triticale

Welsh Triticale (1978) was named in memory of the late Dr. John Welsh, who in 1955 performed the first wheat-rye crosses at the University of Manitoba. It has long bearded heads and is used for wheat weaving.

OUT OF STOCK FOR 2017

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Price(s): $3.00
Packet Size(s): 10 grams
Braveheart Triticale

Braveheart Triticale has bearded heads not quite as long as Welsh and somewhat more plump seeds.

OUT OF STOCK FOR 2017

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Price(s): $3.00
Packet Size(s): 10 grams
Tritinaldia

Tritinaldia was bred by crossing wheat with Haynaldia (a grass) to try to confer more fungus resistance to wheat. The plants have long, plump heads with medium beards. The seeds are a lot longer than red spring wheat.

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Price(s): $3.00
Packet Size(s): 10 grams
Tritordeum

Tritordeum was created in Spain in the 1970’s by crossing a wheat with Hordeum chilense. The cross was merely done to add fungus disease resistance to wheat, but this crop is now grown on a limited scale in Spain as it has been found to be valuable in its own right. It is a fall seeded crop whose bearded heads look like those of 6-row barley and whose seeds are hulled like common barley.

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Price(s): $3.00
Packet Size(s): 10 grams
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